Update on “Where’s Denis?”, the fun game for all the family.

We’re delighted to announce that Denis Condon has resurfaced, although not in Myrtleville.  Liam Maher (who has a lot to answer for – see tomorrow) was trying to get back into the Myrtlevillian good books and took it upon himself to trawl various establishments to find Mr. Condon.  He’s a martyr, is Liam,  A martyr who will be stoned soon, as it happens.

Anyway – found him….and doesn’t he look thrilled??!!

Who wouldn’t look happy when you’re out for a quiet night in a secret location (I hear Nana’s on Douglas Street is a nice spot, by the way) and this happens….

Yes, that’d make your night alright.  We know you’re back in Cork, Denis – come back to Myrtleville (there’s jobs to be done…).

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Have you seen this man?

Missing since a jaunt to the Rockies and notably absent at the swim last night, Denis Condon – where are you??

Whatever we said (and we said a lot, repeatedly), we didn’t mean it (well, maybe a bit, but not really, like) and we want you back (the showers need to be fixed, they keep running so you have to get the sand out of them).

Come back, Denis, all is forgiven (maybe not all, but enough for now).

Results – 2019 RNLI Myrtleville to Church Bay Swim

The results are now online with Sportstiming for the 10th Annual RNLI Myrtleville to Church Bay Swim.

Click here:   https://www.sportsplits.com/races/15595

Thanks to all of the volunteers and sponsors who helped to make the event possible – the RNLI, Coast Guard, Gardai, Order of Malta, Funkytown, Sports Timing, Centra Crosshaven, Port of Cork, Cronin’s Pub, The Edge Sports and numerous fantastic individuals without whom nothing could run.  All of your time and efforts are greatly appreciated.  Thanks again to you all.

RNLI Myrtleville to Church Bay Swim – participant information

Thanks to the 210 entrants.

Each of you will receive an email with participant information and a waiver form for completion.  For convenience, these are here also:

RNLI Myrtleville to Church Bay Swim 2019 – Participant Information

Waiver form for RNLI Myrtleville to Church Bay 2019

It would help at registration if you had this waiver form printed and completed.  

Registration from 17.00 to 18.30 tomorrow.  Safety briefing at 18.30.

See you there.

24 hours to enter

“There are only 24 hours to enter”…..(sing that to the tune of “24 hours to Tulsa” – go on: sing that while you enter). See below for the tune.  Gene Pitney – de berries.

No late entries.  No transfers.  No changes.  Enter before 14.00 on Wednesday 19th or you won’t be swimming. 

ENTER NOW – THE 10TH ANNUAL RNLI MYRTLEVILLE TO CHURCH BAY SWIM.

Waiver form for RNLI Myrtleville to Church Bay 2019

RNLI Myrtleville to Church Bay Swim 2019 – Participant Information

Entries closing at 2pm (14.00 hours) on Wednesday

Entries are open – here: https://myrtlevilleswimmers.niftyentries.com/RNLI-Swim and will close at 14.00 on Wednesday, June 19th, 2019.  There are NO entries on the night, no swaps, no transfers – insurance doesn’t allow it.

The forecast is looking good.  If you want to swim, enter on time.

If you have entered and want to save some time at registration, please download and complete the Waiver form for RNLI Myrtleville to Church Bay 2019 and bring it with you on the night.  All swimmers will have to have one completed.

It’s going to be a great night, so please enter now to be part of it.

Tides and swimming in Myrtleville

Republishing this important article from 2014 on our local tides.  If you don’t have time to read it all, just skip to How might this impact my swim?  It’s important to know.

From Bernard Lynch & Ian Venner

This note is intended for those new and not so new to coastal swimming and simplifies some of the calculations and facts which you may well expect to see.  Much of it is specific to Myrtleville.

The tidal streams (coastal currents) are the most important part of the tides you need to understand as a swimmer.  Most OW swimmers average between 2-3km/hr.  Tidal streams near the shore in the harbour can run at between 0.5 to 1.0 km/hr – so they can make a very big difference to your swim.  The speed of the tidal stream varies during each High Water/ Low Water (HW/LW) tidal cycle, and also varies between spring (very high/very low) and neap (not very high/not very low) tides.  Spring tides occur a day after a full moon and recede over a period of one week to a neap.

The spring/neap maximum flow rate can vary from 0.5 to 1.5km/hr.  The flow rate within a 6 hour tide range will be three times as strong at its fastest (in the middle of the six hours) as in the first and last hour. This is explained by the Rule of Twelfths.

Rule of Twelfths

The level of water does not rise or fall at a constant rate throughout the 6 hour duration of a rising or falling tide.  The amount by which it will do so can be estimated mentally by means of the following rough guide:

  • 1st hour rise or fall = 1/12 of Range
  • 2nd hour rise or fall = 2/12 of Range
  • 3rd hour rise or fall = 3/12 of Range
  • 4th hour rise or fall = 3/12 of Range
  • 5th hour rise or fall = 2/12 of Range
  • 6th hour rise or fall = 1/12 of Range

This impacts tidal speed too – the fastest speed being in the middle of the period between HW and LW. In the table below, assuming a 12 foot rise and fall in the tidal height (typical for Cork Harbour) and a maximum tidal flow rate of 1.5km/hr, you can see the how fast the tide moves and rises/falls.

Time after HW Twelfths Change in Depth in that hour Avg tidal flowkm/h
+0.5hr 1/12 1’ 0.5
+1.5hrs 2/12 2’ 1
+2.5hrs 3/12 3’ 1.5
+3.5hrs 3/12 3’ 1.5
+4.5hrs 2/12 2’ 1
+5.5hrs 1/12 1’ 0.5

What else influences tides?

Other factors can influence tidal heights and flow rates. Low pressure will increase tidal height (think of it as less atmospheric pressure pushing down on the water).  Lots of recent rain will increase the strength of the ebb, especially out of Cork Harbour and Fountainstown too (it’s just more water trying to get out).

How might this impact my swim?

So what does all this mean for swimmers?  Be conscious of the time of HW – not because the beach might be more or less sandy, but because it should influence where/how you swim.  Swim against the prevailing tidal flow, so that if you get tired you will have the benefit of it on the way back.  For example, you might consider a swim from Myrtleville to Church Bay and back on the third hour of a falling tide (tide against you going to Church Bay and with you coming back).  You should not consider doing it on the third hour of a rising tide (tide with you going to Church Bay and against you coming back).

In reality, the tidal flows between Myrtleville Beach, the Dutchman and Bunny’s are fairly limited.  There is a little more effect to consider if going Myrtleville/Fountainstown and particularly at Bunny’s point where the push or pull can be significant on the 3rd and 4th hour. If needed, there are plenty of escape routes onto the rocks between Myrtleville and Fountainstown – weather dependent. Going to Church Bay, however, puts you into much stronger tidal flows and you really need to plan your timings. Generally you would not plan a swim past the Dutchman unless the tide was ebbing (going out) for the return leg. Equally, anything further afield needs careful planning with someone who knows the area and tides.

So what direction does the tide flow?

The diagram below broadly illustrates the direction of flow of the tides around the Myrtleville area.  Tides, especially close inshore, are subject to back-eddies and counter-currents, and there are a few of these to be found in the area shown.

To check tides, either purchase a tide table or click on this link.

You should always know the tide before you swim.  Swim Safe.